Ideas of communicative nature of education in philosophical pragmatism of George Mead and John Dewey

Volodymyr Samchuk

Abstract


The author compares the philosophico-pragmatic models by John Dewey and George Mead, and demonstrates that both philosophers emphasize a communicative and educational character of the social experience. The paper justifies a view that a forward-looking communication promotes creative strategies of behavior-modification and their moral orientation.


Keywords


Pragmatism; philosophy of education; experimental science; democracy; theory of personality; university

References


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